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Joined up thinking for the Irish Left

offsite link New Books Worth Reading Mon Sep 19, 2016 23:25 | Seán Sheehan

offsite link 13 Billion ? Lucky for some? Mon Sep 05, 2016 13:04 | Tony Phillips

offsite link Rebuilding Ireland: Long on Promise, Short on Detail Mon Aug 29, 2016 22:20 | Eoin O'Mahony

offsite link Brexit and Other Issues: Comments on the Current Situation Mon Aug 29, 2016 21:52 | Brendan Young

offsite link Bin Charges: From Private Circus to Public Service Tue Jun 21, 2016 12:38 | Michael Taft

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Spirit of Contradiction

offsite link On The Decline and Fall of The American Empire and Socialism Sat Jan 26, 2019 01:52 | S. Duncan

offsite link What is Dogmatism and Why Does It Matter? Wed Mar 21, 2018 08:10 | Sylvia Smith

offsite link The Case of Comrade Dallas Mon Mar 19, 2018 19:44 | Sylvia Smith

offsite link Review: Do Religions Evolve? Mon Aug 14, 2017 19:54 | Dara McHugh

offsite link Fake News: The Epistemology of Media Wed Jun 07, 2017 11:52 | Gavin Mendel-Gleason

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Dublin Opinion
Life should be full of strangeness, like a rich painting

offsite link Some Thoughts on the Brexit Joint Report 11:50 Sat Dec 09, 2017

offsite link IRISH COMMONWEALTH: TRADE UNIONS AND CIVIL SOCIETY IN THE 21ST CENTURY 14:06 Sat Nov 18, 2017

offsite link Notes for a Book on Money and the Irish State - The Marshall Aid Program 15:10 Sat Apr 02, 2016

offsite link The Financial Crisis:What Have We Learnt? 19:58 Sat Aug 29, 2015

offsite link Money in 35,000 Words or Less 21:34 Sat Aug 22, 2015

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NAMA Wine Lake

offsite link Test ? 12 November 2018 Mon Nov 12, 2018 14:28 | namawinelake

offsite link Farewell from NWL Sun May 19, 2013 14:00 | namawinelake

offsite link Happy 70th Birthday, Michael Sun May 19, 2013 14:00 | namawinelake

offsite link Of the Week? Sat May 18, 2013 00:02 | namawinelake

offsite link Noonan denies IBRC legal fees loan approval to Paddy McKillen was in breach of E... Fri May 17, 2013 14:23 | namawinelake

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Human Rights - Thu Mar 14, 2019 15:33
Every year, 25 million women across the world are forced to obtain unsafe abortions. The United States, through its foreign policy, is deeply complicit in the violation of these women?s right to life and equality under international law. International human-rights frameworks guard against these violations and hold the US and other countries accountable. The International ... Read more

Every year, 25 million women across the world are forced to obtain unsafe abortions. The United States, through its foreign policy, is deeply complicit in the violation of these women?s right to life and equality under international law.

International human-rights frameworks guard against these violations and hold the US and other countries accountable. The International Covenant for Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), for instance, details the basic rights and freedoms guaranteed to all people worldwide, including the right to life, the right to liberty and the right to equality. Such rights are not symbolic: they are grounded in the dignity of each human being and protected by international law.

Since 1966, 172 parties ? including the US ? have signed the ICCPR. It is one of the few human-rights treaties that the US has ratified. But today, the US imposes illegal abortion policies that brazenly violated its obligations under the Covenant and other binding provisions of international law.

The ICCPR spells out the right to access abortion services and safeguards against censorship. It also protects the right to nondiscrimination under Article 3; the right to life under Article 6; the right to be free from torture, cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment under Article 7; and the right to free speech and association in Articles 19 and 22.

US abortion restrictions on foreign assistance, including the global gag rule and Helms and Siljander amendments, breach these fundamental obligations.

The global gag rule prohibits non-U.S. organizations from receiving global health assistance funding if they advocate around, provide, educate or counsel on abortion services as a method of family planning ? even though these organizations use non-U.S. funds to do so. First enacted by President Ronald Reagan in 1984, the policy has been rescinded and reinstated along party lines with each presidential administration. The impact of the rule in the relevant countries is compounded by each iteration of the policy.

The Helms Amendment (in place since 1973, as a reaction to Roe v. Wade) prohibits any foreign assistance from being used for using abortion as a method of family planning. The Siljander Amendment (in place since 1981) prohibits the use of funds for lobbying for or against abortion.

By restricting women?s abortion access, these laws and policies violate their right to life by forcing them to obtain the procedure in unsafe ways. They also threaten women?s access to health care more generally, because many non-U.S. organizations receiving global health assistance are forced to cut services or close.

The global gag rule stifles the speech of doctors and other health care providers, preventing them from informing their patients of all the medical options available to them. This censorship worsens stigma, particularly for individuals living with HIV and AIDS, sex workers, members of the LGBTQ community and people with disabilities.

We must hold our leaders accountable to the human-rights framework that the US and 171 other parties have agreed upon. As state parties prepare for the UN Human Rights Committee meeting on March 25, when they will report on the implementation of the ICCPR, we urge them to insist on access to safe abortion as a right.

The history of the US disregarding international human-rights standards should not be accepted as the status quo. As attacks on women?s rights escalate worldwide, it is more critical than ever that we take the US to task on standards it has promised to adhere to as a law-abiding country.

 

Source: https://www.passblue.com/2019/03/14/us-abortion-restrictions-violate-womens-h...

 

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Human Rights - Tue Mar 12, 2019 21:51
Human Rights Watch urges the Human Rights Council to renew and strengthen the mandate of the UN Commission on Human Rights in South Sudan and ensure it has enough resources to carry out its important mandate to collect and preserve evidence of serious human rights violations and identify those responsible.  This mandate is all the ... Read more

Human Rights Watch urges the Human Rights Council to renew and strengthen the mandate of the UN Commission on Human Rights in South Sudan and ensure it has enough resources to carry out its important mandate to collect and preserve evidence of serious human rights violations and identify those responsible.  This mandate is all the more important given continued abuses and the disappointing lack of progress in the establishment of the AU-South Sudanese hybrid court to investigate and try the most serious crimes.

Throughout South Sudan?s civil war, now in its sixth year, government and rebel forces have repeatedly committed grave crimes against civilians on a massive scale, including unlawful killings, destruction of property, unlawful detentions, torture, enforced disappearances, rape and sexual violence.  Over 4 million people have had to flee their homes, half of whom are internally displaced and the rest in neighboring countries as refugees.

HRW continues to document persistent abuses despite the signing of a ?revitalized? agreement in September 2018, particularly in parts of Western Bahr al Ghazal, Unity, and Central Equatoria.  The abuses have included unlawful killings, destruction of villages, forced displacement and widespread sexual violence. The Commission, in its latest report, also documents emblematic incidents of violence against civilians in these locations, finding that both government and opposition forces committed serious crimes that could constitute war crimes and crimes against humanity.  The Commission was able to identify commanders who may bear responsibility for the crimes in a confidential dossier.

The Commission also documents the powerful and draconian role of South Sudan?s national security and military intelligence which have arbitrarily detained, tortured, abused detainees and are implicated in several enforced disappearances. These findings are consistent with our research. As one 24-year-old Juba university student who was detained for three years without charge, and released in September 2018 following a presidential pardon told us:

Mr. President, impunity continues to be the main driver of these serious, ongoing abuses.

In the absence of another international mechanism to monitor and document human rights violations and abuses, the Commission?s role in collecting and preserving evidence for identifying those responsible for crimes  and potential use in future prosecutions is indispensable.

We urge the Council to renew the mandate for another year. If no progress is made to establish the hybrid court, the International Criminal Court remains the global court of last resort and should be pursued.

This article first appeared on: https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/03/12/council-should-renew-commission-human-rig...

 

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Human Rights - Tue Mar 12, 2019 00:15
GENEVA – Nasrin Sotoudeh, an internationally renowned human rights lawyer jailed in Iran, was handed a new sentence on Monday that her husband said was 38 years in prison and 148 lashes. Sotoudeh, who has represented opposition activists, including women prosecuted for removing their mandatory head scarf, was arrested in June and charged with spying, ... Read more

GENEVA – Nasrin Sotoudeh, an internationally renowned human rights lawyer jailed in Iran, was handed a new sentence on Monday that her husband said was 38 years in prison and 148 lashes.

Sotoudeh, who has represented opposition activists, including women prosecuted for removing their mandatory head scarf, was arrested in June and charged with spying, spreading propaganda and insulting Iran?s supreme leader, her lawyer said.

She was jailed in 2010 for spreading propaganda and conspiring to harm state security ? charges she denied ? and was released after serving half her six-year term. The European Parliament awarded her the Sakharov human rights prize.

A judge at a revolutionary court in Tehran, Mohammad Moqiseh, said on Monday Sotoudeh had been sentenced to five years for assembling against national security and two years for insulting Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the official Islamic Republic News Agency reported.

Sotoudeh?s husband, Reza Khandan, wrote on Facebook that the sentence was decades in jail and 148 lashes, unusually harsh even for Iran, which cracks down hard on dissent and regularly imposes death sentences for some crimes.

The news comes days after Iran appointed a new head of the judiciary ? Ebrahim Raisi, a hard-line cleric who is a protege of Supreme Leader Khamenei. The appointment is seen as weakening the political influence of President Hassan Rouhani, a relative moderate.

Iran, often accused of human rights abuse, said on Monday it had allowed U.N. Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights Kate Gilmore to visit last week at the head of a ?technical mission.

The visit, confirmed by a U.N. official, appeared to be the first in many years by U.N. human rights investigators who have been denied access by the government.

The U.N. investigator on human rights in Iran, Javaid Rehman, raised Sotoudeh?s case at the U.N. Human Rights Council in Geneva on Monday, saying that last week she ?was reportedly convicted of charges relating to her work and could face a lengthy prison sentence.?

?Worrying patterns of intimidation, arrest, prosecution, and ill-treatment of human rights defenders, lawyers, and labor rights activists signal an increasingly severe state response,? Rehman said.

 

Story originally from: https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2019/03/12/world/crime-legal-world/husband-...

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Human Rights - Sun Mar 03, 2019 19:04
In his latest report submitted to the UN Human Rights Council on February 27, UN Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights in Iran Javaid Rehman voiced concern over human rights violations in Iran, in particular the way the death penalty is implemented. A British-Pakistani legal scholar and professor of Islamic law and international ... Read more

In his latest report submitted to the UN Human Rights Council on February 27, UN Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights in Iran Javaid Rehman voiced concern over human rights violations in Iran, in particular the way the death penalty is implemented.

A British-Pakistani legal scholar and professor of Islamic law and international law at Brunel University, Rehman expressed deep regret that children as young as 9 years old can still be executed, noting that at least 33 minors have been executed since 2013.

Retaliating, the Iranian judiciary?s High Council for Human Rights rejected the report as baseless, saying Rehman is “misusing his position to spread propaganda against the Islamic Republic.?

Once again, Tehran has responded by targeting the UN rapporteur rather than the facts reflected in his report, according to human rights activists.

In a statement issued on March 2, the High Council for Human Rights said Rehman?s numerous “interviews” with various media outlets including the BBC, which is ?well known for its hostile reports against Iran,? are ?a blatant violation? of the UN framework, within which he has been chosen as special rapporteur, local news outlets reported.

Focusing on the execution of child offenders, Rehman had said that Iran must “urgently amend legislation to prohibit the execution of persons who committed [a crime] while below the age of 18 years and as such are children, and urgently amend the legislation to commute all existing sentences for child offenders on death row.?

Directly addressing the high authorities in Iran, Rehman had asked them to provide the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights and the special rapporteur with a list of all child offenders on death row.

Responding to the report, Larijani has sufficed to dismiss Rehman’s report as “baseless” and “unrealistic.?

Echoing Larijani’s statement, Iranian Foreign Ministry spokesman Bahram Qassemi also said Iran believes that the extension of the mandate of the special rapporteur for another year is ?unjustifiable and unnecessary.?

Once again, Qassemi stopped short of presenting any evidence proving Rehman’s latest report as irrelevant and unfair even though its SiteJot.

Tehran has not responded yet to Rahman’s allegations, which include coerced confessions, suppressing workers, teachers, and Sufi dervishes of the Gonabadi denomination, and widespread discrimination against the Kurdish, Baha’i, and Sunni minorities.

Human Rights - Fri Mar 01, 2019 15:05
The Federal Ministry of Human Rights of Pakistan recently started a campaign to raise awareness around child abuse that is happening in Pakistan at the moment. The campaign highlights how important it is for parents, teachers, and society at large to be vigilant and inform children about child predators. Like many other countries, child abuse ... Read more

The Federal Ministry of Human Rights of Pakistan recently started a campaign to raise awareness around child abuse that is happening in Pakistan at the moment. The campaign highlights how important it is for parents, teachers, and society at large to be vigilant and inform children about child predators. Like many other countries, child abuse in Pakistan is a serious issues which often goes unreported. This is the first campaign of its kind in the country and it has already received a warm response from both activists and the general public.

Child abuse is not a recent phenomenon nor restricted to a particular region. According to Sahil, an NGO working in child protection services, about 3,445 children (2017 girls and 985 boys) were abused in Pakistan in 2017. However, this number is much higher as most cases are not reported because of social stigma attached to the issue and the lengthy investigation process by the police. Unfortunately, the victims are often abused by their relatives, through business or someone they know and trust which leads many to remain silent.

In recent years, several child abuse scandals have shocked the nation. In 2016, the Kasur child abuse scandal made headlines and, in 2018, the rape and murder of six-year-old girl Zainab Ansari led to protests. These were widely discussed on social media and people demanded that the government punish the culprits and protect children.

Global Voices spoke to Shimaila Matri Dawood, a member of the Kasur Hamara Hai (KHH) group and the Managing Director of a media management company, to learn about their contribution to the campaign:

The Pakistani government has taken a number of steps to prevent child abuse. A National Child protection Centre has been set up by the Ministry which offers free education, counseling and medical treatment. A toll-free telephone Helpline (1099) has also been set up where human rights issues, including child abuse, can be reported.

Credit to https://globalvoices.org/2019/03/01/not-allowed-to-touch-campaign-is-raising-... for the story.

Human Rights - Mon Dec 17, 2018 11:08
As winter heads into Ireland again we have been seemingly hit by more and more storms in the last couple of years. With storm damage to buildings and homes, leaving people without electric and repair bills that at times can’t be paid for. Electric is a major component of everyday life and is vital to ... Read more

As winter heads into Ireland again we have been seemingly hit by more and more storms in the last couple of years. With storm damage to buildings and homes, leaving people without electric and repair bills that at times can’t be paid for.

Electric is a major component of everyday life and is vital to a basic standard of living. In the media, the storms get hyped up and the damage it inflicts. The pictures are shown for pure entertainment at times.

However what is not shown enough are the people that are deeply affected by it. An elderly person who faces these types of circumstances tend to be ignored in the media. It is a common responsibility that should be highlighted throughout the media.

Simply checking on them, providing help or assistance, even when its only a cup of tea can make a huge difference. There should be a system in place that provides emergency care to people based on priority.

On the other end of the spectrum we have people who are faced with damage to their home. Sometimes its just a small roofing leak but other times its large roof repairs in Dublin. Where does the money come from to help repair it? Insurance company’s are getting more and more difficult to deal with and payment can be protracted.

Schemes need to be set in place to provide support and help given on a case by case basis to people who simply cannot afford the repairs to their roof or are left stranded by their insurance company while they wait for payment.

Always get someone to help when looking at guttering at your home. Its an important function to ensure good maintenance on your gutters and helps to avoid other problems on your roof. For problems with your gutters, we recommend calling a gutter repair service like Dublin Roofcare for advice on fixing them.

Thankfully some repair company’s will help and delay taking payment for work. If you or someone you know has this type of problem, don’t be afraid to explain to the roofer the situation. Getting the roof fixed fast can make a huge difference to family’s that simply have no other choice but to continue living in a house that is damaged.

Human Rights - Wed Nov 14, 2018 16:13
Africa?s human rights body has taken a step backward in recent times. How can the African Commission on Human and Peoples? Rights expect governments to heed its call to end discrimination if the commission itself is not setting the proper example? The African Commission on Human and Peoples? Rights (ACHPR) has always been responsible for ... Read more

Africa?s human rights body has taken a step backward in recent times. How can the African Commission on Human and Peoples? Rights expect governments to heed its call to end discrimination if the commission itself is not setting the proper example?

The African Commission on Human and Peoples? Rights (ACHPR) has always been responsible for responding to violence and human rights violations that African governments inflict on their populations. However, it has not always succeeded in avoiding discrimination in its own actions, as demonstrated by its recent decision to revoke the observer status it had granted to the Coalition of African Lesbians.

As a result of that decision, the 63rd session of the ACHPR, held last month in Banjul, Gambia, was not just a polite formality. Human rights defenders in general and LGBTI activists in particular are upset about the ACHPR?s discriminatory actions.

The theme of the session was the fight against corruption in Africa, but many human rights defenders who traveled to the Gambia expressed their concern about the independence of the ACHPR from pressures exerted by the African Union. The African Union considers CAL to be too bold, espousing notions that are contrary to African values ??and traditions.

LGBTI activists fear that the withdrawal of CAL?s observer status is a sign of trouble, since their mission is to combat Africans? discrimination against LGBTI people in general and in this case lesbians in particular.

Back in 2014, the ACHPR approved Recommendation 275, which calls on governments to fight discrimination against people on the basis of their sexual orientation or gender identity. There were signs of positive changes in people?s attitudes and increasing respect for human rights and freedoms. But the latest action of the ACHPR has been a step backwards. A homophobic step backwards.

Human rights defenders are now united in denouncing this injustice. They call on the leaders of the ACHPR to recognize the commission?s responsibility for eliminating the new climate of fear that now reigns in African civil society.

They should realize that they cannot expect governments not to discriminate against LGBT people if the ACHPR itself does so.

To be a human rights defender means accepting the responsibility for defending the rights of everyone without exception. In this case, it means not discriminating against identity organizations such as the Coalition of African Lesbians.

Steeves Winner, the author of this article, is an activist for LGBTI rights in Cameroon who writes under a pseudonym. Contact him at steeves.w@yahoo.com

Human Rights - Sat Aug 25, 2018 16:30
The Socio-Economic Rights and Accountability Project, SERAP, including many Nigerians have demanded the unconditional release of 112 pro-Biafra Imo women who were arrested, detained and remanded in Owerri prison for participating in a peaceful protest to demand the whereabouts of the leader of the Indigenous People of Biafra, IPOB, Nnamdi Kanu. 112 pro-Biafra Imo women ... Read more

The Socio-Economic Rights and Accountability Project, SERAP, including many Nigerians have demanded the unconditional release of 112 pro-Biafra Imo women who were arrested, detained and remanded in Owerri prison for participating in a peaceful protest to demand the whereabouts of the leader of the Indigenous People of Biafra, IPOB, Nnamdi Kanu. 112 pro-Biafra Imo women who were arrested, detained and remanded in Owerri prison for participating in a peaceful protest to demand the whereabouts of the leader of the Indigenous People of Biafra, IPOB, Nnamdi Kanu. The women were remanded in jail till September 3 by Magistrate S.K Durumba for embarking on a peaceful protest. It was also gathered that one of the women (a pregnant woman) who broke down in the court as a result of the alleged beaten earlier received from the police during the peaceful protest was said to have bled profusely before she was rushed to an undisclosed hospital. However, following their continued remand, the concerned Nigerians who condemned their incarceration called for their unconditional release.

Human Rights - Fri Aug 03, 2018 16:28
The traveller community in Galway are living in overcrowded, damp and mouldy accommodation with inadequate sewerage, insecure electricity, no facilities for children to learn or play safely. Many live in sites without regular rubbish collections and where their landlords carry out little to none maintenance despite the fact the Travellers are paying rent for their ... Read more

The traveller community in Galway are living in overcrowded, damp and mouldy accommodation with inadequate sewerage, insecure electricity, no facilities for children to learn or play safely. Many live in sites without regular rubbish collections and where their landlords carry out little to none maintenance despite the fact the Travellers are paying rent for their homes.

The findings, detailed in a report published on Friday, paint a picture of poverty and social exclusion for hundreds of Traveller adults and children across Galway city and county.

The report, compiled by the Galway Traveller Movement, examines conditions at 18 Traveller sites and group housing schemes. It is written as a ?response to over 18 years of prevarication, failed targets and tokenistic interaction? from local authorities, its authors say.

The UN group says: ?housing and accommodation is integrally linked to other human rights and is central to the fundamental underpinning of those rights? ? ie to the ?dignity of the human person?.

Adequate housing, it says, must have adequate space, protection from cold and damp, sustainable access to energy for cooking and lighting, be in a location allowing access to employment, healthcare and education, and enable the inhabitants? ?expression of cultural identity?.

Some 16 families, including 29 adults and 39 children, live at one Carrowbrowne transient site where ?pipes for sinks, showers, washing machines? are constantly blocked and ?water and sewerage comes up over the ground and through the bays?. There is no playground or green space. A second, temporary site in Carrowbrowne is home to 13 families, with 36 children. It is infested with rats and has plumbing and sewerage problems.

There is no alternative accommodation for any of the 16 families, including 25 children, at the overcrowded Cul Trá which is poorly maintained and has no play facilities. Also overcrowded is the seven-bay Tuam Road permanent site, which is home to 16 adults and 22 children.

Outside the city, eight sites and schemes were surveyed, including the six-bay Craughwell permanent halting site a mile outside the village. Families there have been waiting since 2006, when the county council first committed to redeveloping the site to adequate permanent housing.

Bathrooms in outhouses are ?not fit for use?, toilets leak and the units are ?too cold for washing? in. Doors are damaged, windows won?t close and there is no play area.

At Gort Bridge housing scheme outside Loughrea, all seven units are occupied. They are ?cold and damp?, yards are ?infested with rats? and barriers to the site mean emergency services cannot access it.

The report concludes both Galway City and Galway County Councils are breaching their Traveller tenants? international human rights.

Human Rights - Thu Jul 19, 2018 16:32
Terming the Human Rights Council as the United Nations? ?greatest failure?, US envoy to the UN Nikki Haley has alleged that the institution has provided cover for the world?s most inhumane regimes as she defended the Trump administration?s decision to withdraw from it. Last month, the US withdrew from the UN Human Rights Council and ... Read more

Terming the Human Rights Council as the United Nations? ?greatest failure?, US envoy to the UN Nikki Haley has alleged that the institution has provided cover for the world?s most inhumane regimes as she defended the Trump administration?s decision to withdraw from it.

Last month, the US withdrew from the UN Human Rights Council and condemned its ?shameless hypocrisy? in absolving wrongdoers through silence and falsely condemning those committing no offence, saying America will not take lectures from hypocritical institutions.

In her remarks at a top American think-tank ? The Heritage Foundation ? the Indian-American US Ambassador to the UN alleged that ?more often, the Human Rights Council has provided cover, not condemnation, for the world?s most inhumane regimes. It has been a bully pulpit for human rights violators.?

Alleging that Human Rights Council has been, not a place of conscience, but a place of politics, Ms Haley said the UN body has focused its attention unfairly and relentlessly on Israel.

Meanwhile, it has ignored the misery inflicted by regimes in China, Venezuela, Cuba, and Zimbabwe, she said.

?Judged by how far it has fallen short of its promise, the Human Rights Council is the United Nations? greatest failure,? Ms Haley said.

?It has taken the idea of human dignity ? the idea that is at the center of our national creed and the birthright of every human being ? and it has reduced it to just another instrument of international politics. And that is a great tragedy,? Ms Haley said, noting that she did not come to this conclusion happily, or lightly.

?Many of our friends urged us to stay for the sake of the institution. The United States, they said, provided the last shred of credibility the Council had. But that was precisely why we withdrew,? she said.

The right to speak freely, to associate and worship freely; to determine ones own future; to be equal before the law ? these are sacred rights, she asserted.

?We take these rights seriously ? too seriously to allow them to be cheapened by an institution ? especially one that calls itself the Human Rights Council,? she said.

Asserting that no one should make the mistake of equating membership in the Human Rights Council with the support for human rights, Ms Haley said to this day, the US does more for human rights, both inside the UN and around the world, than any other country. The US will continue to do that.

?We just won?t do it inside a Council that consistently fails the cause of human rights,? she said.

Ms Haley said America?s withdrawal from the Human Rights Council does not mean that it has given up its fight for reform.

?On the contrary, any country willing to work with us to reshape the Council need only ask. Fixing the institutional flaws of the Human Rights Council was, is, and will remain one of the biggest priorities at the UN,? she added.

Human Rights in Ireland >>

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